Frequently Asked Questions

JSU is committed to protecting the privacy of all individuals involved in a report of sexual misconduct, sex-based discrimination and/or sex-based harassment, including sexual violence, stalking, dating violence, or domestic violence. All university employees who are involved in the university’s Title IX response, including investigators, hearing panel members, and appeal panel members receive specific instruction about respecting and safeguarding private information.

Under JSU's Sex-Based Harassment and Misconduct Policy, privacy means that information related to a report will only be shared with a limited group of individuals. The use of this information is limited to those individuals who “need to know” in order to assist in the active review, investigation, or resolution of the report, including the coordination of supportive measures. While not bound by confidentiality, these individuals will be discreet and will respect and safeguard the privacy of all individuals involved in the process.

Generally, no. Whether you are the complainant or respondent, the University’s primary relationship is to the student and not to the parent. However, in the event of major medical, disciplinary, or academic jeopardy, students are strongly encouraged to inform their parents.

University officials will generally directly inform parents only when requested to do so by a student or when absolutely necessary, such as in a life- threatening situation.

Further questions or concerns regarding this type of situation, should be directed to JSU's Title IX Coordinator who can provide additional guidance on this matter. 

It depends on whether a formal complaint is filed or not.

If a report is made, but no formal complaint is filed, then the respondent will not be contacted and will not be notified of the identity of the reporting party or the complainant.

If the complainant chooses to file a formal complaint, then the respondent will be notified of the complainant's name and may also be provided information about any third party reporting party.

Supportive measures can be provided even if a formal complaint has not been filed (and even if a formal complaint is never filed).

JSU prohibits retaliation and does not allow anyone to retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce, or otherwise discriminate against any individual for exercising their rights or responsibilities under JSU's Sex-Based Harassment and Misconduct Policy.

Further questions or concerns regarding this matter can be addressed with JSU's Title IX Coordinator, who can provide additional details about the process and protections available.

It depends on whether a formal complaint is filed or not. However, individuals should be aware that not identifying the perpetrator might limit JSU's ability to properly respond.

If a report is made, but no formal complaint is filed, then a respondent is not required to be named. 

If the complainant chooses to file a formal complaint, then a respondent must be named and will need to be notified of the forma complaint. 

Supportive measures can be provided even if a formal complaint has not been filed (and even if a formal complaint is never filed).

JSU prohibits retaliation and does not allow anyone to retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce, or otherwise discriminate against any individual for exercising their rights or responsibilities under JSU's Sex-Based Harassment and Misconduct Policy.

Further questions or concerns regarding this matter can be addressed with JSU's Title IX Coordinator, who can provide additional details about the process and protections available.

Any respondent should avoid contacting the complainant.

The respondent should carefully read and review the documents that have been sent to them by the Title IX Coordinator.

Each party will be given the opportunity to be accompanied to any meeting, interview, or proceeding by an advisor of their choice. In addition to an advisor, each party is also allowed to be accompanied to any meeting, interview, or proceeding by a support person of their choice. A respondent may want to think about who they would like to accompany them to the meeting that has been scheduled.

The respondent should contact the Title IX Coordinator if any meeting needs to be rescheduled. 

We understand it can be difficult for some individuals to learn that they are being investigated for this type of policy violation.  JSU is here to support all individuals involved in the Title IX process. Any party can call (256) 782-5475 to make an appointment to receive free, confidential counseling through the JSU counseling office located at the Counseling Center next door to Sparkman Hall.  Additionally, there is an on-call counselor available 24 hours a day/7 days a week that can be accessed by calling (256) 782-5050 and asking to be connected to the on-call counselor. On-campus residence life staff can also connect someone with the on-call counselor.

If disability related accommodations are needed through the process, the individual needing these accommodations will need to contact Disability Support Services at (256) 782-8380, dss@jsu.edu, or 139 Daugette Hall for more information and to request specific accommodations.

JSU provides free counseling for any student at the Counseling Services office located in 147 Trustee Circle. Please call (256) 782-5475 to make an appointment.

JSU provides free counseling for any employee through the Employee Assistance Program. Please call (800)847-7240 to speak with an EAP counselor.

JSU provide free medical care for students and employees at the RMC/JSU Health Center. Please call (256) 782-5310 to make an appointment.

The Alabama Crime Victims’ Compensation Fund may be able to assist in compensating victims/survivors for health care and counseling services, including emergency compensation. In the state of Alabama, the cost of a forensic rape exam can be billed directly to the Alabama Crime Victims’ Compensation Commission (ACVCC) or, if the victim chooses, to their private insurance. No cost is incurred if the bill is directly submitted to ACVCC. For additional information regarding ACVCC, you may call (800) 541-9388 or visit their webpage at https://acvcc.alabama.gov/.

If an individual is accessing community and non-institutional services, any payment for these services will be the responsibility of the individual.

The Title IX Coordinator nor the Title IX Team will provide legal advice to complainants nor respondents. 

If a complainant wants to purse criminal prosecution, that prosecution is handled by the District Attorney's Office in the jurisdiction where the crime occurred. Further, for information regarding protection from abuse orders and assistance in applying for a protection from abuse order in Calhoun County, Alabama, please contact a Victim Services Officer (VSO) at the Calhoun County District Attorney’s Office at (256) 231-1770.  

Either party can, but are not required to, retain an attorney to serve as their advisor or support person through the Title IX process. If an individual retains an attorney for this matter, any payment for these services will be the responsibility of the individual retaining those services.

If you want to move based on sexual discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence, dating, or retaliation, you may request a room change. Room changes under these types of circumstances are considered emergencies. It is typical institutional policy that in emergency room changes, the student is moved to the first available suitable room. 

The following are examples of other supportive measures that the Title IX office may consider, but the exact supportive measures that may be implemented in any particular case will determined on a case by case basis:

  • Providing access to counseling services and assistance in setting up an initial appointment (on or off campus);
  • Providing access to medical services and assistance in setting up an initial appointment (on or off campus);
  • Rescheduling of exams and assignments (in conjunction with appropriate faculty);
  • Providing alternative course completion options (with the agreement of the appropriate faculty);
  • Changing a class schedule, including the ability to take an incomplete, drop a course without penalty, or transfer sections (with the agreement of the appropriate faculty);
  • Changing a job assignment; o Limiting an individual or organization’s access to certain university facilities or activities pending resolution of the matter;
  • Providing a voluntary leave of absence;
  • Extensions of deadlines or other course-related adjustments;
  • Modifications of work or class schedules;
  • Campus escort services (e.g., providing an escort to ensure safe movement between classes, parking lots and/or activities);
  • Mutual restrictions on contact between the parties;
  • Changes in work or housing locations;
  • Providing academic support services (such as tutoring);
  • Assisting with transportation needs;
  • On-Campus residence lock change;
  • Increased security and monitoring of certain areas of the campus; and
  • Any other measure that can be tailored to the involved individuals (students or employees) to achieve the goals of this policy.

It is important for students and employees to remember to preserve evidence (e.g., videos, photographs, text messages, e-mails, social media posts). There is a limited window of time to obtain and properly preserve evidence. The exact amount of time depends on the type of evidence needing to be preserved; however, the general rule is that this be done as soon as possible after any incident. Taking the step to gather evidence immediately does not commit an individual to any course of action. However, the decision to gather and properly maintain evidence will preserve the full range of options to seek resolution under this policy and/or through the pursuit of criminal prosecution and/or a protection from abuse order.

A medical provider can provide emergency and/or follow-up medical services. The initial medical exam can have two goals: first, to diagnose and treat the full extent of any injury, or physical effect (e.g., stitches for a cut, a cast for a broken arm, concussion protocol for a head injury, prevention of sexually transmitted illnesses, or possibility of pregnancy after a sexual assault) and second, to properly collect and preserve evidence. There is a limited window of time; the exact amount of time depends on the injuries and/or evidence that will need to be collected, but ideally, evidence would be collected as quickly as possible. Taking the step to gather evidence immediately does not commit an individual to any particular course of action. However, the decision to seek timely medical attention after an incident that causes physical harm and gather any evidence will preserve the full range of options to seek resolution under the Sex-Based Harassment and Misconduct Policy and/or through the pursuit of criminal prosecution.

An initial medical exam after a sexual assault may include testing and prophylactic treatment for HIV/AIDS, STIs, and pregnancy; a thorough physical examination, which includes the genital and/or anal area; and a blood draw. There is a limited window of time (typically up to 72 hours) following an incident of sexual assault to preserve physical and other forms of evidence. On campus, the RMC/JSU Health Center can provide medical care to students and employees during their regular business hours; however, the RMC/JSU Health Center is not equipped for forensic examinations. Anyone has the option-and is encouraged- to go to the Northeast Alabama Regional Medical Center in Anniston or Rape Response in Birmingham for care and to have evidence collected. Regional Medical Center is located in Anniston, Alabama and provides forensic exams through its Emergency Department. Rape Response is a standalone SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner) program located in Birmingham, Alabama that provides care and forensic exams to those not suffering from life-threatening injuries. Please call the Rape Response hotline at (205) 323-7273 if you are in need of SANE services.

Jacksonville State University has two important amnesty policies that might help answer this question:

Amnesty for Alcohol and Other Drugs: Jacksonville State University seeks to remove barriers to reporting. An individual who reports sexual harassment or misconduct addressed in this policy (including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault) to the Title IX Coordinator, either as a complainant or as a third party, will not be subject to disciplinary action by the university for their own personal consumption of alcohol or drugs at or near the time of the incident. Further, the JSU Code of Student Conduct includes a “Medical Amnesty Policy,” which also provides for medical amnesty in certain situations.

Good Samaritan Amnesty: Jacksonville State University encourages students to offer help and assistance to others in need. Sometimes students are hesitant to offer assistance to others, for fear that they may get in trouble themselves (e.g., an underage student who has been drinking might hesitate to help an alleged victim of sexual misconduct). A bystander or other person acting in good faith who discloses sexual harassment or misconduct addressed in this policy (including domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault) to the Title IX Coordinator, either as a complainant or as a third party, will not be subject to disciplinary action by the university for their own personal consumption of alcohol or drugs at or near the time of the incident. Further, the JSU Code of Student Conduct includes a “Good Samaritan Amnesty” policy, which also provides for good Samaritan amnesty in certain situations.

The use of alcohol and/or drugs by either party will not diminish the accused individual’s responsibility. On the other hand, alcohol and/or drug use is likely to affect the complainant’s memory and, therefore, may affect the outcome of the complaint. A person bringing a complaint of sexual misconduct must either remember the alleged incident or have sufficient circumstantial evidence, physical evidence and/or witnesses to prove the complaint. If the complainant does not remember the circumstances of the alleged incident, it may not be possible to impose sanctions on the accused without further corroborating information. Use of alcohol and/or drugs will never excuse a violation by an accused individual.

Not unless there is a compelling reason to believe that prior use or abuse is relevant to the present complaint.

If you believe that you have experienced sexual discrimination, sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence, or dating violence, but are unsure of whether it was a violation of JSU's Sex-Based Harassment and Misconduct Policy, you should contact the Title IX Coordinator.

Title IX Coordinator
301 Bibb Graves Hall
256.782.5769
jlargo@jsu.edu 

Director, Community Standards and Student Ethics
301 Bibb Graves Hall
256.782.8080
communitystandards@jsu.edu